Why You Need a French Drain

Water obviously flows downhill and that’s the essential concept behind a French drain; a French drain is basically a slightly sloped trench that’s full of round gavel alongside pipes that work together to lead excess water away from the house. The water that enters those pipes is expelled at a safe distance from the house’s location. The trench bottom should be sloped at least an inch for every 8 feet towards the direction of where you want to water to go. Heavily depending on your specific area, the excess water can end up in the street, low lying area within your property, a dry well or drainage ditch.

French Drains

If you’re experiencing some excess water in your basement or a clammy feeling whenever you enter then you should hire a professional French drain installers. A French drain is also called a footing drain, it surrounds the perimeter of a home at the footing level; this system intercepts almost all the water before it can reach the basement. During the initial construction of a house, French drains are a breeze to install but we can’t say the same if it’s added later when the home is finished; not only will it be tricky but it can cost a lot of money.

Not only will the ground surrounding the house be excavated, but it’s highly possible that decks, walkways and certain landscaping will be damaged during the installation of a French drain. Aside from that, it the location of the house does not have the minimum slope requirement in order for a French drain to work then additional pipes need to be incorporated; the pipes aid in collecting water towards a basin located in the basement. The basement where the sump pump is installed, it lifts and sends the collected water towards the storm drain system.